Google+ May 2013 ~ High Tech House Calls

Cute Dog Never Had To Be Taught to Love Baby

Friday, May 31, 2013

Should You Shutdown Your Computer at Night?

Should You Shutdown Your Computer at Night by Kim Komando

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How to Make Video Phone Calls Using Apple's FaceTime Interface


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Sleep or Hibernate, Which is Better for Your Computer?

Sleep or Hibernate, Which is Best for Your Computer? by Kim Komando

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Windows 8.1 (Blue) Preview

Windows 8.1 Preview by Kim Komando 

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Thursday, May 30, 2013

Four Mobile Payment Systems Tested and Compared


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How to Block Websites


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Computer Manufacturer Survey Results from PCWorld


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10 Ways to Get the Most From Your Wi-Fi-Only Tablet


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Beyond Antivirus Software: Eclectic PC Security for System-wide Audits


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You Have Been Hacked - Now What?


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How to Hire an IT Professional

How to Hire an IT Professional by Entrepreneur Magazine

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Convert a Kindle eBook to a Different Format


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Great iOS Apps for Bargain Hunters


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Wednesday, May 29, 2013

May 2013 eNewsletter


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Tips and Tricks for iPhoto For iOS

http://tinyurl.com/nwo44qf
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Repair or Replace Your Broken Tech?

by Kim Komando http://tinyurl.com/o2gg63t



Your smartphone slides off a table and the screen cracks! Your laptop suddenly goes on the fritz! The only thing your HDTV displays is a blue screen! What do you do?

Various troubles occur in the lives of all gadgets from time to time, and it's usually when the gadget isn't under warranty. When that happens, the first thing you have to decide is whether to repair or replace it.

Unfortunately, it isn't always an easy decision to make. There are many factors you have to consider. And sometimes there are things you didn't consider that mean you end up spending more money than you thought you would.

Insider tip: While the gadget might not be in warranty anymore, you might still have an option. Some credit card companies offer extended warranty coverage if you bought the gadget on their card. Check with your card company to find out.

So, repair or replace: How do you decide?

Well, the first thing to find out is if the gadget is even repairable. Older gadgets might not just be out of warranty; replacement parts might be rare or unavailable.

If there's visible damage, such as a cracked smartphone screen, then start by contacting a reputable repair center for an estimate.

You'll want to get two or three repair estimates from different businesses, so you know you aren't being overcharged.

If the problem is less clear-cut, like a misbehaving computer or TV with a glitch, head online  to see if you can find other people having the same problem. It could be something you can fix yourself for little or nothing. For example, here are 5 common computer problems that most people can fix for free.

Once you determine that the gadget is repairable and you have a fair cost estimate, it's time to get down to business.

The 50 Percent Rule is what many techies live by. It says that if a repair will cost more than 50 percent of a new gadget's price tag, then it's time to buy a new one.

That sounds simple enough, but it doesn't always give you the whole picture.

One big consideration is the age of the item. If your computer is less than 3 years old, for example, then a repair is usually the way to go.

If it's more than 3 years old, you can expect problems to start popping up more frequently. Even if the repair will be less than 50 percent, I'd consider buy a new one. For computers older than 5 years, definitely buy a new one.

Even a budget computer will be faster and more secure than your old computer and should last you for 4 more years. Just remember to recycle your old computer properly.
Click here for my desktop and laptop buying guides.

For tablets, 2 years is about the limit for repairs, especially if you have a budget tablet. Beyond that, you're better off buying a newer model. See the best tablets on the market right now.

Smartphones and cellphones are trickier. Assuming you signed a two-year contract, the amount you paid for your phone isn't the phone's full price.

A $100 phone on contract might actually cost $400 or more. The higher price is the one you'll pay if you buy a new phone. Keep that in mind when you're doing your 50 percent calculation.

Also, remember that you'll be replacing the phone after two years anyway. If you don't, you're just wasting money. Click here to learn why.

For a TV, the age limit is around 3 to 4 years. If your TV is older than that, you can upgrade to a full 1080p, LED back-lighted, Internet-enabled model for less than you paid for your original. Learn more about buying a new HDTV.

The same principles apply to digital cameras, camcorders, e-readers and video game consoles. You can even use the same rules for home appliances like a refrigerator or washing machine.

If you do decide to replace your gadget, you might still be able to sell your old tech. Some people buy broken gadgets for parts or to fix on their own. Learn more about cashing in on old tech gear.

In some cases, you can even donate broken gadgets to local charities for a tax write-off. Click here to find legitimate charities in your area.

Buying a new gadget doesn't have to break the bank. Here are some simple ways to save.
    •    You might be wary of buying refurbished gadgets. Find out why they're a great way to save money.
    •    Want to bring down the price of a gadget? There might be a promo code for that. Learn how to find discounts for any online store.
    •    Just because you're buying new doesn't mean you have to buy the best. Find out why a new 802.11ac router isn't for everyone.

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Carl Thorne
Expert Computer Consulting 

Lab Tested: The Ramifictions of Adding Memory on a Mac

http://tinyurl.com/o8b4chk

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Is it Time to Give Up on Java?

by Kim Komando  http://tinyurl.com/p98msr9



Q. I saw on your Breaking Tech News page that Java got another new update that's supposed to make it safe. Is that really true? It seems like it changes every week! I'm really worried, because a few of the sites I like to use require me to run Java. Please clear this up for me.


A. It's like déjà vu all over again, Stacy! Just when the scary Java headlines had died down, Java came out of nowhere with an update that fixed almost 50 security issues. Of course, a few hours later hackers were bragging about finding a hole in Java that the update missed. So, it's off to the races once more.

For those who haven't been following this, Java is a programming language required for certain programs and websites. It runs many chat sites, online games and programs like LibreOffice.
Hackers have spent the last few months finding security flaws in Java that can help them take over your computer and steal your information.

It seems like every time Oracle, the company that develops Java, patches a security flaw, hackers find another one. That's bad news since Java comes on most computers by default.

Now that hackers have found another new crack in Java, what should you do?

The best thing to do, as always, is uninstall Java completely. This avoids all the security problems. For help deleting Java or any other program you don't want, check out this must-read tip.

Unfortunately, as I said above, some programs and websites require Java to work. If you use one of those, then uninstalling Java isn't an option.

Fortunately, that isn't the end of your security options.

First I should explain that there are two ways Java can run. It can run with standalone programs on your system, or it can run as a plug-in in your Web browser.

The standalone version really isn't dangerous. It doesn't communicate with the Internet so hackers have a much harder time taking control of it. That means using a program like LibreOffice isn't really a security threat.

The real danger is the Java browser plug-in. All you have to do is visit a malicious site with it enabled and hackers can use it to invade your system. Thankfully, you can turn it off.

To start, make sure you have the most-recent version of Java. Once you've installed it, go to Start -- Computer and type "Javacpl.exe" in your search bar. When it shows up, double-click on it to run it.

On some computers "Javacpl.exe" won't show up, so you'll have to look for it manually. Go to Start -- Computer -- Local Disk (C:). If you have a 64-bit computer, go to Program Files (x86) -- Java -- jre -- bin. On 32-bit computers, you'll find it in Program Files -- Java -- jre -- bin.
Double-click Javacpl.exe and find the Security tab. Uncheck the box that says "Enable Java content in the browser." Restart any browsers you have open for the change to take effect.

If you're on a Mac with OS X 10.7 or later, Java is already turned off in your browser. If you want to double check, you can find the Java Control Panel on your Mac by going to System Preferences and clicking on the Java icon. It looks like a piping-hot cup of coffee.

Stacy, since you said you need Java to make some sites work, you'll have to leave the Java plug-in enabled. There is a way to do this without hurting your security.

Go back to the Java Privacy menu and set the security slider to "Custom level." Then select "Prompt User," "Single-click confirmation prompt" and "Prompt user" in the menu that pops up.
Now all sites that use Java will ask for permission before running it. Only give permission to sites you trust! On all other sites, tell Java not to run.

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Carl Thorne
Expert Computer Consulting 

Windows Blue: What is it and Should You Upgrade?

by Kim Komando http://tinyurl.com/nrwuort

Microsoft is making an update to Windows 8. Microsoft is calling it Windows Blue? Will this be any better than Windows 8?

So far, Windows 8 is only on 4 percent of computers. That's less than Windows Vista!
Many believe Windows 8 is the culprit behind the recent decline in computer sales. If anything, I can tell you it hasn't helped.

Sensing disaster, Microsoft announced it would release a new operating system. It was originally code named Windows Blue. Now it's just called Windows 8.1.
At first, that doesn't sound like a substantial upgrade. But once you know what's in it, it's another story.

Does that mean the time has come to upgrade to Windows 8?

Let's start with the added features. I won't call them "new" features. You'll see why in a minute.
Microsoft says Windows 8.1 will fix many of Windows 8's frustrations. The company hasn't provided many specifics, but we can make a guesses.

Microsoft says it wants to "address the learning curve" of Windows 8. I'm guessing that means the return of the Start button.

Dropping Windows' most recognizable feature was a big mistake. Of course, you can get the Start button back in Windows 8 now. But I think Microsoft realizes many people want this on by default.
That doesn't mean Windows 8's tile-based "Start Screen" will go away. In fact, most of the Windows 8 experience will stay the same.

That isn't really a bad thing. Windows 8 has good ideas under the hood. It was just too much of a change all at once.

Microsoft has decided to make the transition a bit more gradual. That means the return of your favorite menus. You know, the ones that actually took you to useful settings right away.
You may have the option to boot straight to the Desktop. That means new users won't get hung up on the Start Screen.

Sensible updates and fixed bugs are great news. Even better news is that Windows 8.1 will be free.
You will need to have Windows 8 or Windows RT, of course. Microsoft hasn't announced a price for people upgrading from Windows 7 or earlier.

I'm hopeful for Windows 8.1. It's possible, though, that these changes will make matters worse.
That's why I recommend you try Windows 8.1 before you buy. Microsoft is making it easy.
On June 26, Microsoft will release a public preview of Windows 8.1. Once it's available, you'll be able to find it on my site with full instructions.

Until then, I'd still stick with your current version of Windows. If Windows 8.1 turns out to be great, then you can upgrade.

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Switch to Mac: Translating from Windows to OS X

Switch to Mac Translating Windows to OS X | Macworld by MacWorld Staff http://tinyurl.com/pdf7z99

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Which Browser is Best for You?

by Kim Komando  http://tinyurl.com/pe62kn6


Wait, what's a Web browser anyway? I asked some folks on the street if they knew! Click here to see what they said! I also wrote a handy beginner's guide to browsers. You can check that out here.
If you've only used the default browser installed on your computer, you might not have the best browser for you. In fact, some online features are designed to work with specific browsers, so you could be missing out!

Plus, the latest versions of Internet Explorer aren't available for XP users. That means you're stuck with an old, slow browser with poor security. Not a good place to be!
There's no rule that says you can only use one Web browser! Why not try several? They're free and they work on Windows (including XP) and Mac.

Chrome - Google's Chrome consistently ranks as one of the fastest browsers around. It also has a clean, minimal interface that shows you more of the sites you visit.
One thing you'll notice when you first start using Chrome is that there's no search bar! In Chrome, the address bar is the search bar. Chrome also lets you use extensions, which are programs that modify and improve your browser.

Chrome also syncs with the Google ecosystem, so it can remember your Google searches and it works hand-in-hand with other Google sites. You can even sync your desktop bookmarks to your smartphone if you use the Google Chrome mobile browser.

Firefox - Mozilla's Firefox is another fast, clean great Web browser that's fast and secure and is known for being highly customizable. There are more than 100,000 add-ons to tailor-make your experience to fit your needs.

It was one of the first browsers to incorporate tabbed browsing. Because it's open-source, it's constantly being updated and improved by both developers and users alike.
Firefox also has a mobile version. This can sync bookmarks and even open tabs with your desktop version.

Safari - Safari is Apple's offering to the browser field, so if you have a serious case of Mac envy, this might be the browser for you. It's quick, stable and user friendly, just like most Apple products.
The real draw is its links with the Apple ecosystem. Safari can sync with iCloud to transfer your user experience across all your Apple gadgets. If you use Safari on your iPad or iPhone, you can sync your bookmarks with your computer.

Opera - Opera has been around for a very long time, but it's flown under the radar for the most part. It's not nearly as widely-used as any of the previous browsers, but not because it's no good!
Opera has a very good track record for security against malicious software. It also has good speed. But with Opera, you'll find plenty of great features like tab-stacking, mouse gestures and built-in ad blocking. It might be a bit different than what you're used to, but long-time Opera users swear by it!

Why not sign up for my newsletter? We will never sell or sell your email address. Unsubscribe at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link at the bottom of the newsletter.
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Carl Thorne
Expert Computer Consulting 


Wait, what's a Web browser anyway? I asked some folks on the street if they knew! Click here to see what they said! I also wrote a handy beginner's guide to browsers. You can check that out here.
If you've only used the default browser installed on your computer, you might not have the best browser for you. In fact, some online features are designed to work with specific browsers, so you could be missing out!
Plus, the latest versions of Internet Explorer aren't available for XP users. That means you're stuck with an old, slow browser with poor security. Not a good place to be!
There's no rule that says you can only use one Web browser! Why not try several? They're free and they work on Windows (including XP) and Mac.
Chrome - Google's Chrome consistently ranks as one of the fastest browsers around. It also has a clean, minimal interface that shows you more of the sites you visit.
One thing you'll notice when you first start using Chrome is that there's no search bar! In Chrome, the address bar is the search bar. Chrome also lets you use extensions, which are programs that modify and improve your browser.
Chrome also syncs with the Google ecosystem, so it can remember your Google searches and it works hand-in-hand with other Google sites. You can even sync your desktop bookmarks to your smartphone if you use the Google Chrome mobile browser.
Firefox - Mozilla's Firefox is another fast, clean great Web browser that's fast and secure and is known for being highly customizable. There are more than 100,000 add-ons to tailor-make your experience to fit your needs.
It was one of the first browsers to incorporate tabbed browsing. Because it's open-source, it's constantly being updated and improved by both developers and users alike.
Firefox also has a mobile version. This can sync bookmarks and even open tabs with your desktop version.
Safari - Safari is Apple's offering to the browser field, so if you have a serious case of Mac envy, this might be the browser for you. It's quick, stable and user friendly, just like most Apple products.
The real draw is its links with the Apple ecosystem. Safari can sync with iCloud to transfer your user experience across all your Apple gadgets. If you use Safari on your iPad or iPhone, you can sync your bookmarks with your computer.
Opera - Opera has been around for a very long time, but it's flown under the radar for the most part. It's not nearly as widely-used as any of the previous browsers, but not because it's no good!
Opera has a very good track record for security against malicious software. It also has good speed. But with Opera, you'll find plenty of great features like tab-stacking, mouse gestures and built-in ad blocking. It might be a bit different than what you're used to, but long-time Opera users swear by it!
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- See more at: http://www.komando.com/toolbox.aspx?mode=print&id=14550#sthash.a7RSFaRU.dpuf
Wait, what's a Web browser anyway? I asked some folks on the street if they knew! Click here to see what they said! I also wrote a handy beginner's guide to browsers. You can check that out here.
If you've only used the default browser installed on your computer, you might not have the best browser for you. In fact, some online features are designed to work with specific browsers, so you could be missing out!
Plus, the latest versions of Internet Explorer aren't available for XP users. That means you're stuck with an old, slow browser with poor security. Not a good place to be!
There's no rule that says you can only use one Web browser! Why not try several? They're free and they work on Windows (including XP) and Mac.
Chrome - Google's Chrome consistently ranks as one of the fastest browsers around. It also has a clean, minimal interface that shows you more of the sites you visit.
One thing you'll notice when you first start using Chrome is that there's no search bar! In Chrome, the address bar is the search bar. Chrome also lets you use extensions, which are programs that modify and improve your browser.
Chrome also syncs with the Google ecosystem, so it can remember your Google searches and it works hand-in-hand with other Google sites. You can even sync your desktop bookmarks to your smartphone if you use the Google Chrome mobile browser.
Firefox - Mozilla's Firefox is another fast, clean great Web browser that's fast and secure and is known for being highly customizable. There are more than 100,000 add-ons to tailor-make your experience to fit your needs.
It was one of the first browsers to incorporate tabbed browsing. Because it's open-source, it's constantly being updated and improved by both developers and users alike.
Firefox also has a mobile version. This can sync bookmarks and even open tabs with your desktop version.
Safari - Safari is Apple's offering to the browser field, so if you have a serious case of Mac envy, this might be the browser for you. It's quick, stable and user friendly, just like most Apple products.
The real draw is its links with the Apple ecosystem. Safari can sync with iCloud to transfer your user experience across all your Apple gadgets. If you use Safari on your iPad or iPhone, you can sync your bookmarks with your computer.
Opera - Opera has been around for a very long time, but it's flown under the radar for the most part. It's not nearly as widely-used as any of the previous browsers, but not because it's no good!
Opera has a very good track record for security against malicious software. It also has good speed. But with Opera, you'll find plenty of great features like tab-stacking, mouse gestures and built-in ad blocking. It might be a bit different than what you're used to, but long-time Opera users swear by it!
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How Fast Are America's Wireless Networks?

How Fast Are America's Wireless Networks by Mark Sullivan
http://tinyurl.com/ol3dl3b

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Set Helpful Email Reminders

by Kim Komando http://tinyurl.com/o8djaxm


Human brains can only hold so much information. Luckily, we live in an age where computers and the Internet have almost unlimited amounts of memory to help us out. Whether you need to remember a birthday, or to pick up something at the store on your way home from work, use NudgeMail to easily send yourself email reminders. All you need to do is open your email program and type a message. For the email subject line type in a day, date or time to receive your reminder, such as April 19, 2013. Then, send the email to nudge@nudgemail.com

Why not sign up for my newsletter? We will never sell or sell your email address. Unsubscribe at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link at the bottom of the newsletter.
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Carl Thorne
Expert Computer Consulting 

HDD vs. SSD: Which disk drive is right for you?

Five Overlooked OS X System Tweaks

   Five Overlooked OS X System Tweaks | Macworld by Kirk McElhearn  
   
http://tinyurl.com/pkmyn9s

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Easily Turn Documents into Audio Files


by Kim Komando http://tinyurl.com/p8jqgyy


Have a bunch of documents you need to sit down and read? What if you could listen to them on a media player instead? Or what if you could burn audio recordings of your files to CDs to listen to them in your car?


Many people enjoy the freedom that audio books afford because they allow easy multitasking. Others simply absorb information better by hearing. These are just a few reasons you might want a program that converts documents into audio files.

AudioDocs is just such a program. It has one function: It takes any Microsoft Word DOC file and converts it into a WAV file that you can listen to on iPods, CDs and digital music players.

The most attractive feature of AudioDocs is its simplicity. The design is clean and the functionality is straightforward. There are only a few buttons to click in the very linear conversion process.

AudioDocs requires Microsoft's .NET Framework 4.5 to run, and it will install it for you if you don't have it already. This process will require a restart of your computer.


You'll be able to select which digital voice you'd like to listen to your DOC in, as well as reading pace and volume. If you have an ebook, text file or other type of document, you'll need to save it in the DOC format before you can convert it.


Check out Calibre or PDFtoWord if you need help converting e-books and PDFs to text.

Use the free LibreOffice to save text as a DOC file if you don't have Microsoft Office.

Once you've converted the document to a WAV audio file, use a program like fre:ac to convert it to an MP3 file for playback on media players. Or use CDBurnerXP to burn the file to a CD.

Cost: Free


System: Windows


Why not sign up for my newsletter? We will never sell or sell your email address. Unsubscribe at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link at the bottom of the newsletter.
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Carl Thorne
Expert Computer Consulting 

Easily turn documents into audio files

5/12/2013

Have a bunch of documents you need to sit down and read? What if you could listen to them on a media player instead? Or what if you could burn audio recordings of your files to CDs to listen to them in your car?
Many people enjoy the freedom that audio books afford because they allow easy multitasking. Others simply absorb information better by hearing. These are just a few reasons you might want a program that converts documents into audio files.
AudioDocs is just such a program. It has one function: It takes any Microsoft Word DOC file and converts it into a WAV file that you can listen to on iPods, CDs and digital music players.
The most attractive feature of AudioDocs is its simplicity. The design is clean and the functionality is straightforward. There are only a few buttons to click in the very linear conversion process.
AudioDocs requires Microsoft's .NET Framework 4.5 to run, and it will install it for you if you don't have it already. This process will require a restart of your computer.
You'll be able to select which digital voice you'd like to listen to your DOC in, as well as reading pace and volume. If you have an ebook, text file or other type of document, you'll need to save it in the DOC format before you can convert it.
Check out Calibre or PDFtoWord if you need help converting e-books and PDFs to text.
Use the free LibreOffice to save text as a DOC file if you don't have Microsoft Office.
Once you've converted the document to a WAV audio file, use a program like fre:ac to convert it to an MP3 file for playback on media players. Or use CDBurnerXP to burn the file to a CD.
Cost: Free
Link: sourceforge.net
System: Windows
- See more at: http://www.komando.com/toolbox.aspx?mode=print&id=14314#sthash.cxfIInHL.dpuf

Easily turn documents into audio files

5/12/2013

Have a bunch of documents you need to sit down and read? What if you could listen to them on a media player instead? Or what if you could burn audio recordings of your files to CDs to listen to them in your car?
Many people enjoy the freedom that audio books afford because they allow easy multitasking. Others simply absorb information better by hearing. These are just a few reasons you might want a program that converts documents into audio files.
AudioDocs is just such a program. It has one function: It takes any Microsoft Word DOC file and converts it into a WAV file that you can listen to on iPods, CDs and digital music players.
The most attractive feature of AudioDocs is its simplicity. The design is clean and the functionality is straightforward. There are only a few buttons to click in the very linear conversion process.
AudioDocs requires Microsoft's .NET Framework 4.5 to run, and it will install it for you if you don't have it already. This process will require a restart of your computer.
You'll be able to select which digital voice you'd like to listen to your DOC in, as well as reading pace and volume. If you have an ebook, text file or other type of document, you'll need to save it in the DOC format before you can convert it.
Check out Calibre or PDFtoWord if you need help converting e-books and PDFs to text.
Use the free LibreOffice to save text as a DOC file if you don't have Microsoft Office.
Once you've converted the document to a WAV audio file, use a program like fre:ac to convert it to an MP3 file for playback on media players. Or use CDBurnerXP to burn the file to a CD.
Cost: Free
Link: sourceforge.net
System: Windows
- See more at: http://www.komando.com/toolbox.aspx?mode=print&id=14314#sthash.cxfIInHL.dpuf

Easily turn documents into audio files

5/12/2013

Have a bunch of documents you need to sit down and read? What if you could listen to them on a media player instead? Or what if you could burn audio recordings of your files to CDs to listen to them in your car?
Many people enjoy the freedom that audio books afford because they allow easy multitasking. Others simply absorb information better by hearing. These are just a few reasons you might want a program that converts documents into audio files.
AudioDocs is just such a program. It has one function: It takes any Microsoft Word DOC file and converts it into a WAV file that you can listen to on iPods, CDs and digital music players.
The most attractive feature of AudioDocs is its simplicity. The design is clean and the functionality is straightforward. There are only a few buttons to click in the very linear conversion process.
AudioDocs requires Microsoft's .NET Framework 4.5 to run, and it will install it for you if you don't have it already. This process will require a restart of your computer.
You'll be able to select which digital voice you'd like to listen to your DOC in, as well as reading pace and volume. If you have an ebook, text file or other type of document, you'll need to save it in the DOC format before you can convert it.
Check out Calibre or PDFtoWord if you need help converting e-books and PDFs to text.
Use the free LibreOffice to save text as a DOC file if you don't have Microsoft Office.
Once you've converted the document to a WAV audio file, use a program like fre:ac to convert it to an MP3 file for playback on media players. Or use CDBurnerXP to burn the file to a CD.
Cost: Free
Link: sourceforge.net
System: Windows
- See more at: http://www.komando.com/toolbox.aspx?mode=print&id=14314#sthash.cxfIInHL.dpuf

Keep Essential Information in Plain Sight with a UV Pen


LifeHacker by David Galloway http://tinyurl.com/o7khu6o


Considering the amount of passwords, PINs, and other vital information, such as Social Security numbers, that we have to keep handy it's not surprising that many people write down information like this and keep it on a sticky note or the back of a business card. If you want to keep essential information readily available and yet hard to decipher, consider picking up a UV pen and LED flashlight so you can write down your passwords on any paper source.
This tip originally came from wilderness survival weblog Dirt Time who originally used the idea to keep maps in the car that showed the way to their cabin in the wilderness but didn't want to leave that information for thieves to find. They marked the routes using UV ink and made sure to keep UV flashlights on hand.
This seems like a great solution if you want to keep a written copy of a master password available but somewhat secure. I currently have a my LastPass password written on the back of a business card hidden away in a small firebox just in case I get amnesia or die and my wife or family needs access to my accounts. It would be much more secure to write this info down with a UV pen and tell anyone I'd want to access the information where it is. You can get a UV marker on Amazon for as little as $2.49 and a UV microlight for $7.25, so for right around ten bucks you can add a lot of security.

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Carl Thorne
Expert Computer Consulting 

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